FOODS RICH IN ANTIOXIDANTS

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Coloured carrots

Wholegrains, nuts and seeds, healthy fats, fruits and vegetables (particularly dark green leafy and cruciferous) are all part of an antioxidant-rich diet. However, some of the foods in these food groups are naturally low in available carbohydrate and therefore have not had their GI measured.

In this month’s shopper’s guide, we will look at some of the foods that have antioxidant properties that also have a low GI.

For people with diabetes
To those of you who count your carbohydrate intake in grams, exchanges or portions, we have included the details for each of these.
15g carbohydrate exchange – a serve containing 12-18g carbohydrate.
10g carbohydrate portion – a serve containing 7.6-12.5g carbohydrate.
 
Ryvitas (Sunflower Seeds & Oats cracker)
GI 48
Serving: 20 g / 0.7 oz (2 crackers)
Energy Available carbohydrate Exchanges Portions Glycemic load
380 kJ or 90 Cal 14g 1 1.5 7
 
Cashew nuts
GI 22
Serving: 30 g / 1.0 oz
Energy Available carbohydrate Exchanges Portions Glycemic load
730 kJ or 175 Cal 8g 0.5 1 2
 
Red kidney beans
GI 36
Serving: 200 g / 7.0 oz
Energy Available carbohydrate Exchanges Portions Glycemic load
720 kJ or 195 Cal 30g 23   11
 
Oranges
GI 45
Serving: 230 g / 8.1 oz (1 medium, edible portion)
Energy Available carbohydrate Exchanges Portions Glycemic load
290 kJ or 70 Cal 28g 2 3 13
 
Carrots
GI 32
Serving: 140 g / 4.9 oz (1 small)
Energy Available carbohydrate Exchanges Portions Glycemic load
180 kJ or 40 Cal 9g 0.5 1 3
Read more:
KarenLau250

Karen Ky Lau is an Accredited Practising Dietitian who works as a Research Dietitian at Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service (SUGiRS).

Contact: here