INSULIN DOSING FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES – MORE THAN JUST CARBS

People with type 1 diabetes essentially don’t produce any insulin of their own, so need to replace the insulin their body isn’t making, by injection or using an insulin pump. They then need to balance the amount of insulin they take with food and beverage intake, physical activity levels and other factors, with the aim …

HOW TO PUT TYPE 2 DIABETES INTO REMISSION

Evidence accumulated over the past few decades indicates that significant weight loss is the key underlying mechanism behind diabetes remission. Indeed, randomised controlled trials indicate that weight loss of 10–15% (8-12 kg (18 – 26 Pounds) for an average adult) may lead to normalisation of pancreatic function and remission of type 2 diabetes (1, 2). …

‘ULTRA-PROCESSED FOODS’ AND RISK OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

According to the NOVA classification system, the phrase ‘ultra-processed foods’ encompasses a wide range of foods and beverages, including (but not limited to): carbonated soft drinks; sweet or savoury packaged snacks (e.g., corn chips, potato crisps, etc…); ice cream, chocolate, candies (confectionery); mass-produced packaged breads, buns, cookies (biscuits), pastries, cakes and cake mixes; breakfast ‘cereals’, …

THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET AND RISK OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

The Mediterranean diet (Med-diet) is a traditional pattern of eating that involves the habitual consumption of foods and drinks from the countries located in and around the Mediterranean Sea. It is characterized by high consumption of vegetables, fruits, olive oil, legumes, wholegrains, nuts, and seafood, moderate intake of dairy (especially fermented varieties like yoghurt and …

TYPE 2 DIABETES AND RISK OF CANCER

Most people with diabetes already know they have a higher risk of premature death, mainly due to their increased risk of cardiovascular disease (e.g., heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease). There is also some evidence that people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing and dying from certain forms of cancer. However, it …

WHY YOU SHOULD BREAKFAST LIKE A KING

Managing the rise in blood glucose levels after meals is an important part of managing type 2 diabetes, and can help to reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, including cardiovascular disease (e.g., heart disease and stroke). There are many factors which affect post-meal blood glucose levels, including the sensitivity of the body’s cells to insulin, …

GLYCEMIC LOAD AND DIABETES

People have long known that, compared to the other major nutrients protein and fat, the amount and type of carbohydrate that we eat or drink has the most pronounced effect on blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Before the glycemic index (GI) was conceived, people with diabetes predominantly counted carbohydrate using carbohydrate exchanges (15 …

FRUIT AND DIABETES

If you have diabetes or are at risk, you may be confused about fruit. Is it a healthy choice or something you should be avoiding due to its sugar content? It is true that fruit contains natural fruit sugars but in whole fruit this is packaged along with fibre, vitamins and minerals. This makes it …

RESISTANT STARCH AND DIABETES

As explained in this month’s Food for Thought, resistant starch is the part of starchy foods that resists digestion in the small intestine. Instead, it acts in a similar way to dietary fibre, passing through to the large bowel largely undigested where it provides fuel for gut bacteria. Bacteria in the large bowel ferment and …

THE MICROBIOME AND RISK OF DIABETES

There is increasing interest in the role that the microbiome may play in our health. One area that is the subject of much recent research is the impact of our gut bacteria on glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown differences in the gut microbiome between people with and without …